Tag Archives: interview

Draw More Income 2017 EP12: Tina Martel

We’re back again with the Draw More Income Podcast! Today we bring you an interview with the incredibly talented Grand Prairie artist, Tina Martel. Sara McKarney guides the conversation through all sorts of topics, like Tina’s teaching career and living in Grande Prairie and the practical concerns of being an artist (and writer). Her experience as an artist runs deep and we highly encourage you to give this episode a listen and learn a little about being a professional artist.

Tina’s book “Not In The Pink” can be purchased at http://notinthepink.ca/.

“Tina Martel is a Canadian artist whose practice includes mixed media, painting, drawing, books, photography, installation and video. Born and raised in Saskatchewan, she began drawing at the age of four, and later, (much later) received a Master of Fine Arts from the University of Calgary and a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the Alberta College of Art and Design. She has been the recipient of numerous grants and awards and has exhibited across Canada, the United States and in Europe. She has been teaching fine arts in the post secondary system for the last 15 years.”

not in the pink by tina martel

not in the pink by tina martel

This episode was recorded by Sara McKarney.
Edited by Ryan Hemphill
Additional support provided by Graeme Dearden and Chris Carson.
Intro music: “Outsider’s Paradox” by springtide (www.springtide.jp), accessed through Free Music Archive.

Draw More Income EP5: Samantha Walrod

A new episode of the podcast is here! Thanks for listening along VAA-CARFAC community!

On Draw More Income today, we bring you Samantha Walrod, being interviewed by Sara McKarney a few months ago. The two talk shop in the midst of a sudden concert and then a sudden apartment!

Samatha is a painter, receiving her BFA from ACAD and her MFA from the U of A

Read Samantha’s artist statement below:

“Samantha Walrod’s work is influenced by uncanny similarities and differences between imagined or reconstructed environments. The figurative elements in her recent body of work are constructed from images of the Canadian Wilderness. Her latest body of work is a response and a record of visits to Banff and Jasper National Parks:

When viewing wildlife from a vehicle, I feel a sense of awe and gratitude at the chance to witness the fleeting passage of a bear, coyote or elk coming into view and then disappearing back into the wilderness. This meeting between motorists and animals adversely affects wildlife, as witnessed in the traces of road kill on the road, and precautionary fencing placed along highways in Banff National Park, designed to keep animals off the road.

Our view of wild animals is multiple and fractured.

Images in Split Seconds, Soft Edges address these fractured viewpoints. Photographic images have been torn apart and put back together again in a slightly off kilter way. The photographic space is interrupted but remains intact. The act of photographing the animals reminds us of the many cultural lenses that mediate our understanding of them.

The act of collage brings to the surface more readily than photography its construction and artificiality. The edges of the ripped paper, the slight tonal differences in the photographs, and the addition of paint on top of the images all act as a filter or an interruption.

Engineers, ecologists and government agencies have responded to road kill and motorist safety in Banff National Park. Wilderness overpasses, underpasses and fences funnel animal traffic across the highway. These overpasses show a level of care from scientific and government communities, they make our society’s response to the issue of road kill more visible. The passes that I have painted and collaged are hard edged next to the organic lines of the surrounding trees and mountains. The painted bridges and highways cut through or interrupt the visual plane, much like highways do through the landscape. These hard edges talk about a difference in speed and movement between wilderness and car culture, reflecting a sense of unease that is present at these intersections.

I ask the viewer to contemplate their accountability in the existing situation. I am, and we are, directly involved and invested in the shifting boundary between nature and culture.”

Samantha has work up in Parts Gallery in Toronto (http://partsgallery.blogspot.ca/) and has an upcoming show at New Zones in Calgary. To view more of her work visit http://www.samanthawalrod.com.

Samantha Walrod, Wolf and Dots Road, Acrylic on Panel

Draw More Income EP2: Lee Nielsen

Proud to bring you episode two of the Draw More Income podcast! 

Meet the talented Lee Nielsen, being interviewed by Visual Arts Alberta-CARFAC’s own Sara McKarney. They chat about all sorts of things from working as a teacher to how to make a living in the arts.

“In addition to his art practice [Lee] has worked in a variety of fields as an
animator, illustrator, concept artist, and designer. In 2003 he initiated
a sole proprietorship, Humanate Enterprises, to deal with illustration
work. Since then it has expanded to include art, illustration, design
and other related projects.”

Check out Lee at http://humanate.com/

22_Lee-01

Draw More Income EP1: Terrance Houle

Introducing Visual Arts Alberta – CARFAC’s brand new Draw More Income Podcast!!! In this podcast, our employees and board members will be galavanting around the province collecting interviews consisting of half hour to forty-five minutes of honest conversation about what it is like to be an artist in Canada, and more specifically Alberta. This isn’t going to just be conversation about ideas and artwork though; it will be focussed on what it is like to be a professional, a member of the workforce, and a contributor in the Canadian/Albertan arts and culture community. As always, we are looking into how people draw more income. 

To start things off, say hello to the renowned Albertan artist, Terrance Houle! 

http://www.terrancehouleart.com/